Category Archives: Seminar Series

Newsletter 20 – 26 November

Dear all,

Due to the fact that there was no PGF Seminar last week, we are pleased to announce that we have not one, not three, but two(!) seminars for you to enjoy this Wednesday! We hope to see you there, or at one of the other seminars being given this week!

Best wishes,

The PGF Committee

PGF SEMINARS:

Date/Time: Wednesday 22 November 2017, 13:00. Venue: Room 1.03, Armstrong Building.

BACKWATER ECONOMIES? A FOODWAY FRAMEWORK FOR EXAMINING WETLAND WORLDVIEWS IN THE PREHISTORIC PAST‘ BY PHD CANDIDATE FLOOR HUISMAN (DURHAM UNIVERSITY)

One of the major problems we face when trying to study past worldviews is the way in which our own, modern western worldview influences our research, from the questions we ask, to our final interpretations. Within the sub-discipline of wetland archaeology, for instance, we often ask why past communities chose to live in such marginal landscapes. We assume that wetlands were ‘special’ in some way, either as ‘ritual’ or ‘sacred’ places, or as resource rich environments. We assume a particular worldview amongst the wetland communities living there, one focussed on ‘the wild’, which sets them apart from contemporary, ‘domestic’ ‘dryland’ communities. Yet rather than assuming the presence of such opposing worldviews, we should assess to what extent the landscape or environment in which people lived truly affected their worldview and the formation of particular community identities. This paper will explore how we may be able to do this by considering prehistoric communities’ (inter)relation with the environment through a study of past foodways and environmental change. It will present the preliminary results of my PhD research which examines the use of domestic and wild plant and animals in relation to a changing environment in and around the later prehistoric East Anglian Fens (c. 4000 BC-40 AD). It asks if and when a wetland worldview and accompanying identities came into being as the East Anglian Fens changed from a dryland basin into Britain’s largest wetland. Thus, this paper explores a new approach to understanding past worldviews, by integrating archaeological with environmental data. It is hoped this will allow us to move beyond our modern worldviews and gain a better understanding of past worldviews and the way these shaped communities.

AND

A CONTROVERSIAL TRIBUNICIAN STATUTE: THE PLEBISCITUM CLAUDIANUM AT THE BEGINNING OF THE SECOND PUNIC WAR (218 BC)’ BY PHD CANDIDATE ROBERTO CIUCCIOVE (NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY)

The Plebiscitum Claudianum was controversial tribunician bill, which dealt with very significant economic matters especially related to sea-trade, involving also, at its very core, the political relations between the senatorial elite and the emerging equestrian order. The year 218 BC represented a crucial moment in the history of Rome and the whole Mediterranean world. We are at the very beginning of the Second Punic War, a conflict that will reshape the politicalmilitary order for many decades to come. In the same year a lex Claudia was proposed and passed. As usual, there will be refreshments in the form of tea, coffee and biscuits will be provided.

HISTORY SEMINAR: ‘THE SACRED AND THE SATIATED: HISTORY, ARCHAEOLOGY, AND THE LIMINAL SPACE OF BLACK RESISTANCE’ BY PEGGY BRUNACHE (UNIVERSITY OF DUNDEE)

Date/Time: Wednesday 22 November 2017, 16:00. Venue: Room 1.05, Armstrong Building.

Traditional scholarship of the Black diaspora has predominantly focused on the examination of primary and secondary historical documents. Moreover, the historiography of slavery of the French Antilles, for example, has been weaker than other regions, especially when compared to British and American counterparts. More recent historical studies have shifted to critically engage larger questions as to how enslaved and free black communities actively participated in strategies to either escape or circumvent gendered and racialized systems of oppression. Since the late 1980s, historical archaeology has risen to the challenge to provide a unique contribution to further our understanding of past lifeways of the Black Atlantic via engendered methodological frameworks for studying artefact patterning and examining the nature of material culture. This presentation hopes to progress critical dialogue on Black agency and choices by engaging place, material culture, and space, through an alternative understanding of conceptual sites of conflict and resistance. I will consider two geographically disparate 19th century archaeological sites, one in the French Caribbean and the other in North America, associated with the slave economy to consider new transformative theories on Black resistance as liminal space for identity formation and societal transformation. This production of knowledge serves as an exploration for re-historicising the past through an intersectionality of structurally hierarchical categories of difference in the archaeological study of enslaved Africans and their descendants. http://www.ncl.ac.uk/hca/seminars/item/thesacredandthesatiated.html

CLASSICS AND ANCIENT HISTORY RESEARCH SEMINAR: ‘PHILOLOGICAL NETWORKS: EDITING THE CLASSICAL TEXT IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY CAMBRIDGE’ BY DR KATHERINE EAST (NEWCASTLE)

Date/Time: Wednesday 22 November 2017, 17:00. Venue: Room 2.50, Armstrong Building. http://www.ncl.ac.uk/hca/seminars/item/philologicalnetworks.html

ARCHAEOLOGY SEMINAR: ‘TEXTILES AND TRADE IN THE ATLANTIC IN THE 18TH CENTURY’ BY PROFESSOR GIORGIO RIELLO (WARWICK)

Date/Time: Thursday 23 November 2017, 16:00. Venue: Room 2.16, Armstrong Building. http://www.ncl.ac.uk/hca/seminars/item/textilesandtradeintheatlanticinthe18thcentury.html

EVENT: ‘MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. AND THE POOR PEOPLE’S CAMPAIGN AT FIFTY’ BY DR KERRY TAYLOR (ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, THE CITADEL, CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA, USA)

Date/Time: Tuesday 21 November 2017, 18:00. Venue: Room G.33, Barbara Strang Teaching Centre.

A specialist in twentieth-century US, labour, African American and oral history, Dr Kerry Taylor came to the Citadel after serving as the Associate Director of the Southern Oral History Program in Chapel Hill. He co-edited volume 4 and volume 5 of the Papers of Martin Luther King, Jr. (University of California Press, 2000 and 2005) and American Labor and the Cold War (Rutgers University Press, 2004). In addition to directing The Citadel Oral History Program, Taylor has been extensively involved in grassroots organising in Charleston and across the South, particularly in the “Fight for 15” movement to organise fast food workers for a $15-an-hour minimum wage and union recognition. http://www.ncl.ac.uk/hca/events/item/martinlutherkingjrandthepoorpeoplescampaignatfifty.html

EXHIBITION: ‘PATHS ACROSS WATER: LOST STORIES OF TYNESIDE AND THE CARIBBEAN

Until 26 November. Venue: Old Low Light in North Shields

Come for the history, the poetry table, the oral stories, a video artwork reacting to shifts in the wind outside, a story-telling booth that will create both an oral archive and a digitally mixed soundscape exploring people’s responses to the sea and to the paths of migration connecting the North East with not only the Caribbean but also the rest of the world. And so much more.

MUSEUM EXHIBITION: ‘FRONTIER FASHION: GLASS BANGLES OF THE ROMAN NORTH

Until 3 January 2018. Venue: Great North Museum

A mini exhibition Frontier Fashion: Glass Bangles of the Roman North that focuses on Newcastle University archaeologist Dr Tatiana Ivleva’s research on Roman glass bangles in Britain. Tatiana is particularly interested in the popularity of glass bangles in Northern Britain, on both sides of Hadrian’s Wall. A small number of fascinating artefacts are on show in the display which is taking place in the new temporary exhibition space, formerly the Mithraeum. Further details can be found here.

Postgraduate Forum Seminars – Semester 1 Timetable

This year we have scheduled many exciting seminars and talks. It was absolute pleasure to get such a good turnout for our first proper seminar last week. Don’t worry if you’ve missed it, here is the timetable for what else is on this semester. Make sure to write the dates down in your calendars and be there (or be square!).

We are looking forward to seeing all your lovely faces!

Wednesday 18th October, 1-2pm, Armstrong 1.03

Tom Whitfield, Archaeology PhD candidate, Newcastle University

‘It’s Always Sunny in Colonial Williamsburg’ – The Virginian Gentry have an Identity Crisis [1764-1775]

Wednesday 1st November, 1-2pm, Armstrong 1.03

Ayshah Johnston, History PhD candidate, Newcastle University

‘”Pity My Distress”: Pauper women’s appeals for aid under the 1880 Poor Relief Act in Barbados’

Wednesday 8th November, 1-2pm, Armstrong 1.03

Thomas Stewart, History PhD candidate, Edinburgh University

‘The impact of the 1973 Dundee East by-election on the SNP in Dundee’.

Wednesday 22nd November, 1-2pm, Armstrong 1.03

Roberto Ciucciove, Classics & Ancient History, Newcastle University

‘A controversial tribunician statute: the plebiscitum Claudianum at the beginning of the Second Punic War (218 BC)’

&

Floor Huisman, Archaeology PhD candidate, Durham University

Backwater economies? A foodway framework for examining wetland worldviews in the prehistoric past

Wednesday 8th December, 1-2pm, Armstrong 1.03

Christopher Whittaker, Archaeology Masters, Newcastle University

Breedon Hill, Leicestershire: an archaeological investigation at a multi-period hilltop site.

&

Rowan Thompson, History PhD candidate, Northumbria University

‘England expects every man will do his duty’: Trafalgar Day, Naval Commemoration and National Identity, 1895-1939

Wednesday 13th December, 1-2, Armstrong 1.03

Madeleine Pelling, History of Art PhD candidate, University of York

Writing the Museum: Mary Hamilton’s A Catalogue of Curiosities at Bulstrode and Horace Walpole’s The Duchess of Portland’s Museum

Newsletter 16th-22nd October

Hi everyone! This week there are multiple research seminars, including a wonderful PGF Seminar(!), going on at the School this week. Furthermore, there is a temporary museum exhibition at the Great North Museum. Hopefully we will catch you at one of the events! Best wishes, The PGF Committee

PGF SEMINAR: ‘‘IT’S ALWAYS SUNNY IN COLONIAL WILLIAMSBURG’ – THE VIRGINIAN GENTRY HAVE AN IDENTITY CRISIS [1764-1775]’ BY THOMAS WHITFIELD (NEWCASTLE ARCHAEOLOGY PHD CANDIDATE)

Date/Time: Wednesday 18 October 2017, 13:00.

Venue: Room 1.03, Armstrong Building.

In this seminar he will give a brief overview of his research findings, discuss what led him [a PhD Candidate researching eighteenth-century North-East England] to undertake research into Colonial Virginia and talk about the experience of working in an institution where his output will be incorporated into the public interpretations of one of America’s most popular tourist attractions. Throughout the 1760’s Virginia’s gentry were dogged by a succession of political crises and scandals; both relating to wider imperial affairs and to local, provincial matters. Unsettled and unnerved by these scandals and crises, the political elites of the colony were necessitated to re-habilitate their public images if they wanted to survive re-election and hold onto their seats in the House of Burgesses. In his research, Tom uses a combination of textual, visual and material sources to demonstrate just how Virginia’s gentry went about trying to rehabilitate their image by shifting their political alignments between two key individuals of the period, John Wilkes and William Pitt [the elder].

CLASSICS AND ANCIENT HISTORY RESEARCH SEMINAR: ‘HIPPONAX (AND ARCHILOCHUS) IN THE MUSEUM: ANCIENT SCHOLARSHIP ON ARCHAIC GREEK IAMBOS.’ BY DR ENRICO EMANUELE PRODI (OXFORD)

Date/Time: Wednesday 18 October 2017, 17:00.

Venue: Room 2.50, Armstrong Building. http://www.ncl.ac.uk/hca/seminars/item/hipponaxandarchilochusinthemuseum.html

ARCHAEOLOGY RESEARCH SEMINAR: ‘THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF THE BALTIC CRUSADES: NEW UNDERSTANDINGS OF CONQUEST, COLONISATION AND RELIGIOUS CONVERSION IN MEDIEVAL NE EUROPE.’ BY DR ALEKSANDER GRZEGORZ PLUSKOWSKI (READING).

Date/Time: Thursday 19 October 2017, 16:00.

Venue: Room 2.16.

They constructed castles, encouraged colonists, developed towns and introduced Christianity. At a time of deteriorating climate, their impact on the local environment, especially plants and animals, would have been profound. Since many aspects of the natural world were sacred to the Baltic tribes, this impact would be synonymous with the cultural changes that created a new world at this frontier of Christendom. (read further)

MUSEUM EXHIBITION: ‘FRONTIER FASHION: GLASS BANGLES OF THE ROMAN NORTH’

Date/Time: 12 October 2017 – 3 January 2018.

Venue: Great North Museum

A mini exhibition Frontier Fashion: Glass Bangles of the Roman North that focuses on Newcastle University archaeologist Dr Tatiana Ivleva’s research on Roman glass bangles in Britain. Tatiana is particularly interested in the popularity of glass bangles in Northern Britain, on both sides of Hadrian’s Wall. A small number of fascinating artefacts are on show in the display which is taking place in the new temporary exhibition space, formerly the Mithraeum. Further details can be found here.

History Lab 2017: Creating Dialogue.

histroy-lab

 

History Lab 2017: Creating Dialogue.

Teesside University, Wednesday 5 April 2017.

The Curve T1.01, 12:30 – 6:00pm

 

12:30 – 1pm: Registration

1:00 – 2pm: Welcome and Panel 1 – Thinking about Militarism and Peace (Chair: Sophie Roberts)

Rowan Thompson, (PhD, Northumbria University) ‘An essential institution in British aviation’: The Air League of the British Empire, Empire Air Day and the creation of ‘airmindedness’ in the 1930s

Jasmine Calver, (PhD, Northumbria University) The Comité Mondial des Femmes contre la Guerre et le Fascisme and the Comitern: French and Soviet women’s anti-fascist collaboration in the 1930s

2:00 – 2:20pm: Break

2:20 – 3:20pm: Panel 2 – Rediscovering History through Alternative Sources (Chair: Natasha Neary)

Laura Flannigan, (MA, York University) Edmund Dudley’s Tree of Commonwealth and discourses on royal morality in the early sixteenth century

Tracey Jones, (PhD, Teesside University) ‘Colliery Amazons and Venuses’: The ‘Picturesque’ Pit Brow Women of Wigan

3:20 – 3:30pm: Break

3:30 – 5:00pm: Panel 3 – Public History and Collaboration (Chair: Rebecca Saunders)

Judith Phillips, (PhD, Teesside University) National identity, gender, social class and cultural aspiration in mid-nineteenth century England and France: Josephine Bowes (1825-1874), collector and museum curator

Spencer Brown, (MA, York University) ‘What should York remember?’ A community history project

Harriet Beadnell, (PhD, York University) Organising Postgraduate Conferences – The pros and cons of planning student-led events and some tips on where to start

5:00 – 5:15pm: Break

5:15 – 6:00pm: Keynote – Dr Ben Roberts (Teesside University), Title TBC

6:30pm: Conference Dinner at Al Forno Restaurant, Southfield Road, Middlesbrough.

 

Please register via: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/creating-dialogue-symposium-tickets-32689403887?aff=eac2    Registration closes on 24th March 2017.

NEWCASTLE CLASSICS AND ANCIENT HISTORY RESEARCH SEMINARS, SPRING 2017

Please find below the programme for the Classics and Ancient History Research Seminars taking place this semester at the School of History, Classics and Archaeology, Newcastle University. All seminars begin at 5.00 pm on the given day and, unless specified below, take place in Room 2.50 on the 2nd floor of the Armstrong Building. (A campus map may be foundhere.) Further details about the final session listed below, a commentary workshop on Hesiod’sTheogony led by Profs Jenny Strauss Clay and Athanassios Vergados, will be circulated in due course. I or Micaela Langellotti will be sending out a weekly notice in advance of each seminar, along with contact details about that week’s dinner arrangements. Any enquiries may be directed us at john.holton@newcastle.ac.uk and micaela.langellotti@newcastle.ac.uk.
 
All are very welcome to attend!
Wednesday 15th February
Young Research Panel (PhD candidates, Newcastle University)
Roberto Ciucciove: Lex Marcia Atinia: new strategies of communication and legislative productivity within the Romannobilitas at the beginning of the II century BC
Chris Mowat: An Intersex Manifesto: Naming the non-binary constructions of the ancient world
James Mullen: Beyond Persianization: the adoption of Near Eastern traditions by Alexander the Great
 
Wednesday 22nd February
Dr Rolf Strootman (Utrecht)
Global empire, local religion: Religious patronage and imperial integration in the Hellenistic Near East
 
Thursday 23rd February (Room TBC)
Dr Claudia Beltrao da Rosa (UNIRIO/Newcastle)
Images of the Gods in Cicero
 
Wednesday 1st March
Prof. Nicholas Purcell (Oxford)
Micro-global history puts the ancient Mediterranean in its place
 
Wednesday 8th March
Dr Jamie Wood (Lincoln)
From Cyprian to Priscillian: making and breaking bishops in late Roman Spain,ca. 250-ca. 400
 
Wednesday 15th March
Prof. Costas Panayotakis (Glasgow)
The collection of Latin moral maxims attributed to the playwright Publilius
 
Wednesday 22nd March
Dr Caroline Vout (Cambridge)
Classicism Meets Modernity: Greek and Roman Art in the Nineteenth Century
 
Wednesday 26th April
Dr Katherine McDonald (Exeter)
Writing women: understanding the goddess Reitia
 
Wednesday 3rd May
Dr David Lewis (Nottingham)
Occupational hazards: measuring the extent of the division of labour in the economy of classical Athens
 
Wednesday 10th May
Dr Oliver Passmore (Newcastle)
Deixis and Identity in the Odyssey
 
Wednesday 17th May
Dr Lisa Hau (Glasgow)
Pathos with a Point. Reevaluating ‘Tragic History’
 
Wednesday 24th May (Room 1.04, Armstrong Building)
Prof. Jenny Strauss Clay (Virginia) and Prof. Athanassios Vergados (Heidelberg/Newcastle)
Workshop: Commentary on Hesiod’s Theogony
 

Newcastle University Roman Archaeology Seminar Series, Semester 2 Winter/Spring 2017

All the following seminars are on Tuesdays at 18:00 hrs in Armstrong Building room 1.06

7 Feb 2017 – James Harland (York University)

‘The End of Roman Rule and the Adventus Saxonum: Rethinking Ethnicity in post-Roman Britain’

 

21 Feb – Simon Esmonde Cleary (Birmingham University)

‘The Mediterranean Mattered More: Imperial weakness and local responses either side of the Channel at the turn of the fourth and fifth centuries A.D.’

 

28 Feb – Indra Werthmann (Durham University)

‘The Image of the Past: Reassembling identities through Roman objects in early Anglo-Saxon society, 5th to 7th century AD’

 

7 Mar – Barbara Birley (Vindolanda Trust)

‘Recent work at Vindolanda, excavations and artefacts’

 

14 Mar – David Breeze (Edinburgh)

‘Bearsden: Life in a Roman fort’

 

21 Mar – Alexis Haslam (Pre-Construct Archaeology)

‘Industry and Magic: Quarrying and Selective Deposition in Ewell, Surrey’

 

25 Apr – TBA

 

2nd May – TBA

All welcome.  Colleagues wishing to join the speaker for dinner are asked to contact Tatiana Ivleva (Tatiana.ivleva@ncl.ac.uk) in advance

 

Newcastle University History Seminar Series, semester 2, 2016-7

All the following seminars are in Armstrong Building room 1.03.

Professor Richard Clay, Professor of Digital Humanities,

‘Vandalism and Terrorism during the Revolutionary France’,

Wednesday, 22 February. 3.30pm.

Dr Michael Pierse, Queens University Belfast,

‘Thinking Globally about Irish Working-Class Writing?’,

Wednesday 1 March, 5pm.

Professor Thomas Scharf, Professor of Social Gerontology,

‘Constructing home over the life course in rural Ireland: towards a model of at-oneness’,

Wednesday, 15 March, 5pm.

Dr Laurence Marley, National University of Ireland, Galway,

‘Empire, faith and class in a Belfast mill district: 1914-21’,

Wednesday, 22 March, 5pm.

Dr Brian Kelly, Reader in American History, Queen’s University Belfast

‘WEB Du Bois, Black Agency, and the “Slaves’ General Strike”: Problems in the Historiography of US Emancipation’,

Wednesday, 3 May, 5pm.

Dr Emma Cheatle, NUHRI Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Newcastle University,

‘Object, Landscape and Confinement in the Writing of Mary Wollstonecraft’, Wednesday, 10 May, 5pm.

Professor Neville Kirk, Manchester Metropolitan University,

‘Transnational Radicalism: The Case of Tom Mann and Robert Samuel Ross’,

Wednesday, 17 May, 5pm.

All welcome. We particularly welcome PG students. Refreshments provided